“Sometimes it takes (…) the fact that you’re writing for a friend, that you’re not writing seriously, that you really find what it is you’re wanting to say, and how you want to say it.”
John Hodgman
silezukuk:

Charles Addams - New Yorker / Feb. 16, 1981 [***]

silezukuk:

Charles Addams - New Yorker / Feb. 16, 1981 [***]

“Your feelings don’t predict the future.”
Dennis Palumbo

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1989: The Brain of Mister X (unlettered pages published 2004)

Another Sienkiewicz deep cut.

Several of Sienkiewicz’s unlettered pages for an unfinished story from 1989 were finally published in Mister X: The Definitive Collection trade paperback, volume 1.

No reason is given for the cancelled project, or any other kind of context for that matter. The only reason I could date this as coming from 1989 was thanks to Sienkiewicz adding the date alongside his signature on one of the pages.

dept-of-research-and-development:

Elio answers the question of how he makes such realistic-looking pencil lines in Photoshop with a level of patience and generosity I would find difficult if I had been asked the same question, and the answer was “with a pencil.”

dept-of-research-and-development:

Elio answers the question of how he makes such realistic-looking pencil lines in Photoshop with a level of patience and generosity I would find difficult if I had been asked the same question, and the answer was “with a pencil.”

tannhausergatorade:

Carlos Sampayo and José Muñoz did a Billie Holiday biocomic in 1991

“Technique is grammar, picture making is about content. Don’t forget to put in the art.”
Stapleton Kearns

pixoholic:

Hold Softly, Hand of Death! by Gerry Conway and Alex Toth.

via Joe Ackerman.

stefsketches:

Fresh art supplies from Kinokuniya to play with today.

“I’m not doing it for monetary reasons, and I’m not doing it for exposure. I’m doing it because it seems like fun. I think fun is a really good reason to do stuff.”
Sammy Harkham
dept-of-research-and-development:

There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.
Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. It’s about conveying the idea of a person typing at a desk in an office. When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.
…
I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.

dept-of-research-and-development:

There’s a lot of gold in this Comics Reporter interview with Sammy Harkham from last year on the occasion of the release of a collection of his comics called Everything Together.

Of particular interest to me are his thoughts on the value of laying out comics with many small panels per page:

For me, when I make my panels smaller, and there are more panels on the page, it’s easier for me to draw. It becomes more about pure information. It’s about conveying the idea of a person typing at a desk in an office. When you only have two or three inches to do that in, it takes a lot the pressure off of making a nice drawing and just trying to make a readable drawing.

I don’t like to be too fussy. It also reminded me of the kind of storytelling I like in film or in literature. I have a preference for clean, declarative sentences, right? So if the comic can kind of mirror that — and I think that that one does in the sense that it’s very unadorned and very straight-forward — hopefully each panel gives you the information. As you work on that, you start realizing that emotional complexity doesn’t necessarily come out of composition or realistic faces. A realistic face trying to convey sadness may not be as effective as two dots and a sad mouth. A downward line. Then you realize that whole idea that Chris Ware talked about in ‘97 in his [The Comics Journal] interview of comics as music, all of the sudden you understand what he’s talking about in a whole new way, because it’s not, if you look at each at each individual panel as notes of music, any individual note isn’t necessarily complex, it’s the arrangement of those notes that creates complexity. So working on “The New Yorker Story” I started seeing that these were really simple images, really simple ideas, as individual panels. It’s the arrangement of these panels, these really easy-to-read images, that creates — hopefully — something richer.

Important early influences, still among the best - Stef Bartolic (source)

Important early influences, still among the best - Stef Bartolic (source)

Richard Corben (source)

Richard Corben (source)

THB

THB